Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies

Videos

CLACS Videos

  • Credibility and Specificity: When do Brazilian Voters Act on Information about Corruption?Postcolonial Studies and Afro-Brazilian StudiesThe Modern Gaze in Latin America: Bogotá, 1930-1950

  • Revolutions and Civil Wars in the Republic of Peru, 1828-1895: Between Client Networks and Mobilization from BelowThe Rise of a Colonial Olympic Movement: Sport and Politics in 1930s Puerto RicoBolivia's Processes of Social ChangeEl Zapatazo Limpio: Late Liberal Outrage in El SalvadorOur View From the BorderColonial Sabor: Crafting Savory Bodies through Cuban Music and DanceThe Challenges Facing the Brazilian Developmental StateRafael Correa's TechnopopulismAn Informal Conversation with an Illinois AlumnusGender, Asset Accumulation and Wealth in EcuadorAmerica’s Insular Empire Through Interimperial and Intraimperial OpticsHuman Rights and Brazil's Intractable Poor: Flogging, the Death Penalty, and Slavery's Abolition in Comparative'Identity', Peace and Learning through Rural Music Festivals in Northern ColombiaExperimental Investigation of Second and Third Language Acquisition in BrazilBrazilian Foreign Policy: The Economic Consequences of Mister LulaThe Consumption of Coloniality? Indigenous politics at the Twilight of Neoliberal MulticulturalismLatin America: State Formation and the Emergence of New Forms of Property over Natural ResourcesDrug Trafficking and Impunity in United States, Mexico and ColombiaThe Oracular Sanctuaries of the Inca Empire: Their Nature and FunctionFrom Havana's Stages to the Silver Screen: A Reconsideration of the Cuban Zarzuela's 'Death by Film'The Invention of Latin America: A Transnational History of Anti-Imperialism, Democracy, and RaceWhat's so New About the New Multicultural Brazil?Poverty and the Political Economy of Public Education Spending: Evidence from Brazil Major Trends in Drug Trafficking and Organized Crime in Latin America and the Caribbean in the 21st CenturyThe State of Education in Brazil Today: Challenges and InnovationsMonkeys, Humans and Yellow Fever: A Case of Lethal and Costly Misinformation in southern Brazil"VAMOS": Active Living, Enhancing HealthGender, Race, and Tourism in Andean Peru and  Chiapas, MexicoNet Art, Digital Poetry and Rebellion in Latin America: Digital Contestation Post Y2KDevelopment, Inequality and the Rising of a "New Class“Technological Vanguards at the Periphery: Inter-tecnologidad in the AndesBossa Nova On Balance: Vetting Versions and ValuesRacial Democracy: The Sociological History of a ConceptLeviathan Evolving: New Varieties of State Capitalism in Brazil and BeyondO Sublime Sertão: Miragens do Brasil em O Sertanejo, Os Sertões e Grande Sertão: Veredas

  • Home Fortification of Complementary Foods with  Multiple Micronutrients Powders: Planning a New Strategy to Prevent Anemia in Brazilian ChildrenResource Nationalism in Latin America: Concepts, Politics and PolicyThe Revolt of the WhipRegional Disparities in Brazil: Evolution, Consequences, and Policy AlternativesPeruvian Writers: Mario Vargas Llosa and Jose Maria ArguedasFree Colored under Slavery in BrazilDisplaced for Development? Indigenous Peoples Rights and Extractive Industries Development in the Peruvian Andes and AmazoniaSaving South America's Ecosystem FunctionsRural Nicaragua Under the New Sandinista Government: A Report from the FieldDifferent Forces: Cultural topographies and the liberal state in Oaxaca, MexicoFour or Five Myths about Brazil and Latin AmericaIllinois International: The Making of a Transnational Gang CrisisMulticulturalism and Miscegenation in the Construction of Latin America`s Cultural Identity

  • Comparative Literature in Brazil: Aspects and ProblemsThe Alliance for Progress: Social Science and Hemispheric Hegemony

  • Illinois International: A Conversation with Ecuadorian President Rafael CorreaIllinois International: The Shifting Political Climate in Latin America

  • Brazil's Rising Status in the 21st Century: A Roundtable DiscussionLemann Institute: Inauguration Ceremony and Reception

Video list by year:

    • 2014-02-11

      Credibility and Specificity: When do Brazilian Voters Act on Information about Corruption?

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Matthew S. Winters</b><br/> <i>Department of Political Science, University of Illinois</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:It is commonly believed in Brazil that voters are tolerant of corruption as long as corrupt politicians are providing other public goods that voters demand. We use survey experimental methods to explore how widespread this view actually is and find little evidence in a nationwide survey that voters will condone corruption even when politicians are otherwise performing well. Instead, we find that voters strongly punish corrupt politicians. In a follow-up survey, we explored the extent to which the source and specificity of the corruption information matter. We find that Brazilian voters discern between information provided by central government audits as compared to opposition party accusations and between corruption in which a mayor is directly implicated as compared to the municipal administration more generally. Our results give us reasons to be optimistic about the likely success of anti-corruption campaigns in Brazil.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2014 Lecture Series

    • 2014-02-04

      Postcolonial Studies and Afro-Brazilian Studies

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Antônio Sérgio Alfredo Guimarães</b><br/> <i>Professor of Sociology, University of São Paulo<br/> 2014 Lemann Institute Distinguished Visitor</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:To reflect on post-colonialism in relation to Afro-Brazilian studies is to situate a very specific historical context of decolonization. In this talk, I will approach three moments of this process of decoloniality, as different moments of African- Brazilian struggles, and as moments of reception of new ideas circulating internationally. The first one was the concept of internal colonialism as a legacy of the American civil rights movement. The second one, stretching to the 1980s, and advancing studies in India, under the influence of British Marxist historiography (history from below).the current days, was Fanon's reception by the new generation of Brazilian black activists. Finally I will concentrate my attention on the writing of a new Brazilian historiography of slavery and its implicit dialog with the Black movement, an almost perfect match of what did the subaltern.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2014 Lecture Series

    • 2014-01-30

      The Modern Gaze in Latin America: Bogotá, 1930-1950

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Cesar Peña</b><br/> <i>Ph.D. Candidate, Art Education, University of Illinois</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2014 Lecture Series

    • 2013-12-05

      Revolutions and Civil Wars in the Republic of Peru, 1828-1895: Between Client Networks and Mobilization from Below

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Nils Jacobsen</b><br/> <i>Associate Professor, History, University of Illinois</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:Puerto Rico’s Olympic representation at the Central American and Caribbean Games serves as a window not only to see nationalism, but also to observe and analyze colonial, imperial, and regional political interests. For Puerto Ricans in the 1930s, at stake in Central American and Caribbean Olympism was the meaning of the nation, the terms of colonialism, the uses of Olympic diplomacy, and the limits of insular authority. The political, economic, and social instability of the 1930s occurred alongside accomplishments in Puerto Rican Olympism, allowing, along the way, a brief but profound moment of national pride and colonial compliance. That is to say, the success on the athletic field fed the growing belief in the nation, and since this occurred under a colonial relation it portrayed the U.S. regime as a “benevolent empire.” Therefore, what is special about the Puerto Rican construction of national identity is that it was carried out in a colonial context. In fact, these early “national” delegations ambivalently represented both Puerto Rico and the U.S. Puerto Rican delegations were sent to represent the U.S. in order to foster Good Neighbor policy and as a bridge between Anglo and Latin America. To be sure, Puerto Rico is not the only place where sport and colonial politics collide. C.L.R. James’ classic Beyond a Boundary (1963) pioneered this process for his native Trinidad and British imperialism. Yet, Puerto Rico presents a different case, one that is pertinent to the Spanish Caribbean in its relation to Latin America and to the U.S. Empire.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-11-21

      The Rise of a Colonial Olympic Movement: Sport and Politics in 1930s Puerto Rico

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Antonio Sotomayor</b><br/> <i>Assistant Professor, Latin American and Caribbean Studies Librarian, Adjunct Professor Department of Recreation, Sport and Tourism</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:Puerto Rico’s Olympic representation at the Central American and Caribbean Games serves as a window not only to see nationalism, but also to observe and analyze colonial, imperial, and regional political interests. For Puerto Ricans in the 1930s, at stake in Central American and Caribbean Olympism was the meaning of the nation, the terms of colonialism, the uses of Olympic diplomacy, and the limits of insular authority. The political, economic, and social instability of the 1930s occurred alongside accomplishments in Puerto Rican Olympism, allowing, along the way, a brief but profound moment of national pride and colonial compliance. That is to say, the success on the athletic field fed the growing belief in the nation, and since this occurred under a colonial relation it portrayed the U.S. regime as a “benevolent empire.” Therefore, what is special about the Puerto Rican construction of national identity is that it was carried out in a colonial context. In fact, these early “national” delegations ambivalently represented both Puerto Rico and the U.S. Puerto Rican delegations were sent to represent the U.S. in order to foster Good Neighbor policy and as a bridge between Anglo and Latin America. To be sure, Puerto Rico is not the only place where sport and colonial politics collide. C.L.R. James’ classic Beyond a Boundary (1963) pioneered this process for his native Trinidad and British imperialism. Yet, Puerto Rico presents a different case, one that is pertinent to the Spanish Caribbean in its relation to Latin America and to the U.S. Empire.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-11-14

      Bolivia's Processes of Social Change

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Felix Muruchi Poma</b><br/> <i>Bolivian Activist and Lawyer</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:Felix Muruchi’s personal history as a miner, construction worker, student and union activist, nonprofit organization, political prisoner and later candidate, and most recently indigenous rights lawyer provides an extraordinary lens to grasp Bolivian struggles for social justice. Praise for From the Mines to the Streets http://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/books/kohlfro This is quite possibly the best book about labor and political organizing in Latin America I ever have read. It is a real page-turner. -Frederic Hicks, University of Louisville This book is a must read for gaining a deeper understanding of the country that is arguably undergoing the most interesting political - and citizen's led - revolution in Latin America today. - Coletta Youngers Washington Office on Latin America Of the six books and dozens of articles we read, the students overwhelming identified 'From the Mines to the Streets' as the course’s most engaging and interesting text. – Jason Tockman, University of British Columbia Felix Muruchi Poma was born in a highland indigenous community in Bolivia where he lived a typical rural childhood herding llama. When he was seven, his family moved to the mines in Lllallagua where his father worked as a miner. By the age of 16 Felix was working an illegal miner, and then went off to military service at 17 where he witnessed the Barrientos military coup. He then became a state miner and union activist during the conflictive period of military government repression where he witnessed the San Juan Massacre in 1967. At 24, determined to study, he moved to Oruro where he supported himself working in construction while attending the local university. He was an active student leader who was imprisoned and tortured when the Banzer dictatorship (1972-78) closed the universities. Captured and sent to Chile as part of Plan Condor, he managed a harrowing escape, finding sanctuary in the Dutch embassy in Santiago and exile in Holland. When Banzer fell, he returned to Bolivia’s mines but was forced into exile again when General Garcia Meza seized power in 1980. He returned to a democratic Bolivia in 1986 and founded an NGO dedicated to training unemployed miners. He was active in El Alto struggles, fighting to found a local university, where he subsequently became a student leader once again and was active in the 2003 Gas War. In 2009, some thirty years after he first became a university student, he graduated as an attorney and is currently active in supporting his community of origin. He is co-author of two books, From the Mines to the Streets: a Bolivian activist’s life and Ponchos Rojos (2008) about a highland indigenous movement. The link to the book is http://utpress.utexas.edu/index.php/books/kohfro<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-11-07

      El Zapatazo Limpio: Late Liberal Outrage in El Salvador

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Ellen Moodie</b><br/> <i>Associate Professor, University of Illinois</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:El Zapatazo Limpio took on flesh in a flash, like so many hashtagged movements in a social-networking age. Fifty young people arrived to fling shoes at El Salvador's Legislative Assembly building—their fury sparked by a hasty vote to raise politicians' salaries. But another, older crowd soon arrived. At first they seemed to share the retweeted outrage. The two crowds chanted back and forth: “The people! United! Will never be defeated!” But then the older marchers suddenly turned. They had come not to protest the government—now controlled by former FMLN revolutionaries turned political party—but to oppose what they saw as a cyber -“bourgeoisie.” Shoving, lighting firecrackers, they pushed the younger protestors out of the public plaza. The shoe-throwing Zapatazeros, mostly too young to remember the country's civil war, were shocked. They saw themselves as a citizens' movement in liberal democratic tradition. Which group was the unruly mob? Which represented “civil society”? Who was duped into protest? This paper, based on interviews carried out over the past year, takes this April 2012 moment as emblematic of changing modes of doing politics and shifting forms of citizen action. It aspires to unravel a moment of late liberalism, Salvadoran style, in which ideologies of left, right and center come undone. Ellen Moodie is Associate Prof of Anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of El Salvador in the Aftermath of Peace: Crime, Uncertainty and the Transition to Democracy. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010, among other publications.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-10-31

      Our View From the Border

      <i>Speakers</i>: <b>Kate Morgan-Olsen and Rick Cheney</b><br/> <i>Members of the NGO NO More Deaths</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:No More Deaths is a volunteer-run organization based in southern Arizona that works to end death and suffering at the US-Mexico border through direct action. No More Deaths provides humanitarian aid to migrants in the Sonoran Desert and recently deported immigrants, documents abuses of migrants’ human rights, and organizes for immigrant and border justice. This presentation will offer firsthand accounts of trends in migration; human rights abuse documentation in Nogales, Sonora; migrant support in the Sonoran desert; and allied movement building in communities throughout Arizona. In addition to the presentation we will hold time for questions during which we look forward to opening a more comprehensive dialogue about our southern border. Additional resources and printable reading materials can be found at our website: http://www.nomoredeathsvolunteers.org/resources.htm.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-10-24

      Colonial Sabor: Crafting Savory Bodies through Cuban Music and Dance

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Pilar Egüez Guevara</b><br/> <i>PhD, Anthropology, University of Illinois</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:Using discursive analysis of a range of historical sources, this presentation discusses the emergence of novel cultural and aesthetic categories of classification in Havana during a moment of profound transformations in nineteenth century Cuban society. Since the early 19th century a growing class of free urban blacks and mulatos/as gained influence in a range of fields claimed by white creoles, such as painting, European music, dress and dance. In response, white creoles developed strategies to reinforce their social distinction as a class vis a vis this bourgeoning urban class of color. These strategies included cultivating and appropriating new, highly embodied practices of distinction such as “good manners” and taste. By the second half of the century, the widespread popularity among white creoles of an African-influenced music and dance genre, the danzón, disrupted their efforts to culturally distance themselves from everything black. In this context emerged the new category of sabor, an embodied discernment quality of appreciating, feeling and performing African influenced Cuban music and dance. As white creoles incorporated sabor into their systems of taste on the verge of Cuban independence late in the century, they helped construct and incorporate a kind of eroticized (white bourgeois) dancing body into the national imaginary.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-10-22

      The Challenges Facing the Brazilian Developmental State

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Philippe Faucher</b><br/> <i>Professor of Political Science, University of Montreal</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:Why is Brazil’s economy, despite its potential, growing at a disappointing rate? After a strong performance of 7,5% in 2010, it fell back to 1% in 2012. As late developers, emerging economies are facing simultaneously, with varied intensity, four major challenges, which are currently, and for many years, will undermine their growth performance. These challenges are identified as: 1) the middle-income trap, 2) the competitive trap 3) the globalization trap, and 4) the Dutch disease. This presentation will define each problem using examples within BRIC countries of the mechanisms at play. Added to these challenges, Brazil’s peculiar state led development model comes at a cost not captured by the traditional prescriptions over what has been identifies as the “custo Brazil”. This hybrid system of economic governance is responsible for the creation of grabber friendly institutions with multiple vested interests making reform slow and expensive.<br/> <i>Speaker Bio</i>:Philippe Faucher is professor and former Chair of the Political Science Department of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at the Université de Montréal (www.pol.umontreal.ca/personnel/Faucher_Philippe.htm). He teaches international political economy and globalization. He has been working on the political and economic development of Latin America, concentrating on Brazil and Mexico. His current work deals with Latin America’s political institutions and economic policies. His current research project considers what political factors are contributing to the appropriation of economic rent from natural resources in a comparative perspective. Philippe Faucher worked as consultant to the Minister of administration and reform of the state (1995), and with the science and technology Minister (1999) of the Federal government of Brazil. He was a guest professor on several occasions in Brazil (UnB), France (IEP) and Morocco. He writes a monthly column on international economics and energy for Montreal's daily newspaper La Presse (www.cerium.ca/_Faucher-Philippe).<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-10-17

      Rafael Correa's Technopopulism

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Carlos de La Torre</b><br/> <i>Director, International Studies Program Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Kentucky</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:This talk analyzes the authoritarian outcomes of Rafael Correa’s project of redemptive and technocratic modernization from above. It shows how populist appeals and technocratic reasoning are combined in Correa’s project of state building. Windfall rents have allowed his government to pursue democratization understood as an increase in social spending, but at the cost of pluralism, civil rights, the rule of law, and checks and balances. In contrast to other leftist governments, Correa has not created participatory institutions, and is in conflict with most social movements, which his administration has labeled as corporatist and special interest groups.<br> <i>Speaker Bio</i>: Carlos de la Torre earned a B.A. (with honors) in sociology from the University of Florida, Gainesville (1983), and an M.A. (1987) and Ph.D. (1993) in the same field from the New School for Social Research in New York City, supported by a scholarship from the Organization of American States, a doctoral Fellowship from the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (FLACSO) of Ecuador, and an Alvin Johnson Dissertation Fellowship from the New School. While still a doctoral candidate he edited, with Felipe Burbano, Populism in Ecuador: An Anthology of Texts (Quito: ILDIS, 1989), and published “The Ambiguous Meanings of Latin American Populisms,” which appeared in Social Research (Summer 1992), staking out one of the areas of research for which he is best known. His dissertation, published as La Seducción Velasquista (Quito: FLACSO and Libri Mundi, 1993), which studied the rise in the 1930s and 1940s of the magnetic leader Velasco Ibarra in the unique context of Ecuadorian socioeconomics, won the New School’s Alfred Schutz Memorial Award. On finishing his doctorate, he took up an appointment as Assistant, and later Associate, Professor of Sociology at Drew University, and served as its Director of Latin American Studies from 1995 to 2001. He then joined the sociology and anthropology faculty at Northeastern University as an Associate Professor, remaining there for three years; during most of his tenure at Northeastern he also served as the Director of the Latin American, Latino, and Caribbean Studies program. In 2003 he returned to Ecuador to direct the Ph.D. program in social science at FLACSO. Currently he is Professor and Researcher in the Political Studies Program. It was while teaching a class on race and ethnicity at Drew that Carlos de la Torre first delved deeply into that topic, and when he first began seriously researching racism in Ecuador. Important publications on that topic, which became the second major branch in his researches, soon followed, among them Racism in Ecuador: Experiences of the Indian Middle Class (Quito: CAAP, 1996; rpt., Abya-Yala, 2002); “Everyday Forms of Racism in Contemporary Ecuador: The Experiences of Middle-Class Indians,” Ethnic and Racial Studies, 22, No. 1 (1999); “Racism in Education and the Construction of Citizenship in Ecuador,” Race and Class, 42, No. 2 (2000); and Afroquiteños: Ciudadanía y Racismo (CAAP, 2002). He continued his study of racism in Ecuadorian education as a Fulbright New Century Scholar in 2007-08. His latest article on that topic, written with Carmen Martínez, is “Racial Discrimination and Citizenship in Ecuador’s Educational System,” published in Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies, 5, No. 1 (2009). He returned to the subject of populism as a Woodrow Wilson Center Fellow in 2008-09 and continued on that topic as a Visiting Resource Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin in 2010. During his Guggenheim Fellowship term, he will build on this work, with a project entitled “Understanding Popular Support for Populist and Authoritarian Regimes.” In addition to the publications already mentioned, Carlos de la Torre has contributed over twenty chapters to anthologies, written over thirty articles for refereed and popular journals, coedited four volumes, most recently The Ecuador Reader (Duke UP, 2008), with Steve Striffler; and two monographs: ¡Un Solo Toque! Populismo y Cultura Política en Ecuador (CAAP, 1996) and Populist Seduction in Latin America (Ohio UP, 2000; 2nd ed., 2010).<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-10-10

      An Informal Conversation with an Illinois Alumnus

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Diego Quiroga</b><br/> <i>Vice President Student and External Affairs and Dean of the General College of the San Francisco University, Quito, Ecuador (USFQ)</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:Diego Quiroga received his Ph.D. in Anthropology at UIUC in 1994 and immediately began teaching full-time at the Universidad San Francisco de Quito. His research focuses on human ecology, political ecology, medical anthropology in the Amazon, Galapagos Islands and the Andean region. After completing his studies he became the Dean of Humanities and Social Science from 1994-1996; Dean of Academic Affairs in 1996 and Dean of the Graduate School in 1999. Since 2002 he is the Co-Director of the Galapagos Academic Institute for the Arts and Sciences and since 2004 he serves as the Vice President Student and External Affairs and Dean of the General College of the University. Quiroga’s latest publication is Crafting nature: The Galapagos and the making and unmaking of a “natural laboratory” Journal of Political Ecology: Case Studies in History and Society, Volume 16 (2009).<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-10-04

      Gender, Asset Accumulation and Wealth in Ecuador

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Carmen Diana Deere</b><br/> <i>Distinguished Professor of Latin American Studies and Food & Resource Economics, University of Florida, Gainesville</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>:This presentation argues that the study of asset ownership is important to the analysis of gender inequality as well as household outcomes. Drawing upon the 2010 Ecuador Household Assets Survey, I present estimates of the gender asset and wealth gaps. While the gender asset gap varies depending on the particular asset, Ecuador is characterized by a minimal overall gender wealth gap, a result that is largely explained by this country’s marital and inheritance regimes. Further, our empirical work shows how women’s share of wealth is related to their household bargaining power and outcomes which are more favorable to them.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-10-03

      America’s Insular Empire Through Interimperial and Intraimperial Optics

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Augusto Espiritu</b><br/> <i>Associate Professor of History, University of Illinois </i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: Much has been written about the complexities of “Americanization,” which names the dominant ideology in the U.S. insular empire in the half century after the War of 1898. But there has been precious little written about its rival discourse in hispanismo, which highlights the unity of the Spanish raza, or “race,” and provides a basis for critiquing “Anglo-Saxonism.” In this talk, I will explore the symbolic interimperial contest between the United States and Spain in the (neo) colonies of the American insular empire, especially from the vantage point of Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Filipino nationalist intellectuals. I will examine hispanismo through a comparative, intraimperial methodology, viz., across three distinct sites of U.S. empire, in both the Caribbean and Southeast Asia, exploring concretely shared historical experiences and posing the similarities and divergences in hispanismo’s articulations. Finally, I will end with a few speculations on hispanismo’s consequences for culture and politics in the empire and beyond.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-09-26

      Human Rights and Brazil's Intractable Poor: Flogging, the Death Penalty, and Slavery's Abolition in Comparative

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Peter Beattie</b><br/> <i>Associate Professor of History, Michigan State University </i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: Why was Brazil was among the first nations in the world to abolish the death penalty while it was one of the last to abolish slavery? This paper compares Brazil to other nations, with a pointed a comparison with the U.S. Beattie argues that the different cultural and legal heritages of the U.S. and Brazil, and their very different paths to abolition explain why there are such different attitudes toward the death penalty in both nations.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-09-05

      'Identity', Peace and Learning through Rural Music Festivals in Northern Colombia

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Ian Middleton</b><br/> <i>Graduate Student, Music, University of Illinois</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: In this paper I present the rural music practice of tambora from Northern Colombia as central to practitioners' identification as non-violent. I show some of the ways in which it has become entwined with the formalization of music and dance education, and the public projection of peace, or the absence of violence, through music festivals in the region. I first consider how the group of people involved in tambora has expanded through the establishment of educational clubs where young people learn from older musicians. I also discuss a shift in repertoire which has accompanied this change, as children's music games have been adopted, or maintained, by adults. Second, I go on to consider the arguments of locals who claim that tambora festivals help minimise violence in the region by strengthening community identification, preventing the desertion of young people to armed groups, and allowing towns to present an image of non-violence. I end by showing three central ways in which, for people of the region, tambora bears significant associations with peace.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-08-27

      Experimental Investigation of Second and Third Language Acquisition in Brazil

      <i>Speakers</i>: <b>Tania Ionin</b><br/> <i>Associate Professor - Linguistics, University of Illinois</i><br/> <b>Elaine Grolla</b><br/> <i>Professor of Linguistics, University of São Paulo</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: This talk will examine how learners of Brazilian Portuguese as a third language interpret noun phrases with and without articles, with a particular focus on how these learners are affected by cross-linguistic influence from their prior languages, English and Spanish. Brazilian Portuguese, English and Spanish have a three-way distinction in how they express generic interpretation. In English, a generic statement about cats can be made using an article-less plural form, as in ''Cats love milk''. If the definite article is used with a plural form, as in ''The cats love milk'', the statement is about specific cats, rather than cats in general. In contrast, in Spanish, definite articles are required for generic readings: ''Los gatos adoran la leche'' can be a statement either about cats in general, or about specific cats. Finally, in Brazilian Portuguese, definite articles are optional with generic readings, so that both ''Os gatos adoram leite'' and ''Gatos adoram leite'' can be statements about cats in general. This three-way distinction allows us to formulate specific predictions for how learners of Brazilian Portuguese as a third language interpret noun phrases with and without articles in generic environments, depending on whether they are influenced by transfer from English, from Spanish, or from both languages. We report the results of two experimental studies of learners'' linguistic judgments; these studies were made possible by the support of a collaborative Lemann Institute grant.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies</br> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Fall 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-05-01

      Brazilian Foreign Policy: The Economic Consequences of Mister Lula

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Paulo Roberto de Almeida</b><br/> <i>Sociologist and Diplomat</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: The presentation will deal with the presidential diplomacy developed during Lula's Administration, in the context of the international agenda and the main features of previous diplomacy, handled by the professional staff at Itamaraty during the previous two mandates of FHC. It is important to take into account the world vision of PT leaders, as it has a direct impact over the diplomatic agenda implemented during Lula's two mandates. No one of the main diplomatic objectives of president Lula -- a permanent chair at the UN Security Council, the consolidation and expansion of Mercosur as the hub of an economic integrated space in South America, and the successful conclusion of multilateral trade negotiations -- was achieved, and the reasons were lack of appropriate strategies and too much ideology. The most negative consequences of Lula's two terms were the commoditization of external trade and an erosion of competitiveness in the industrial sector, both due to domestic factors, not external forces. Bio: Currently serving as Deputy General Consul of Brazil in Hartford CT, Paulo Roberto de Almeida holds a Ph.D. in Social Sciences from University of Brussels, and a Masters in Economic Planning from University of Antwerp. As an academic he taught Law Studies at Uniceub, and was an Invited Professor at IHEAL - Latin America High Studies Institute - University of Paris-3 in Sorbonne in 2012. He served as an Economic Counselor at the Embassy of Brazil in Paris from 1993 to 1995, was Head of Financial Policy Division at Itamaraty from 1996 to 1999, served as Minister-Counselor at the Embassy of Brazil in Washington from 1999 to 2003, worked at the Strategic Affairs Unity of the Presidency from 2003 to 2007 and served as Deputy Commissioner of Brazil at Shanghai Expo 2010.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies</br> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-04-30

      The Consumption of Coloniality? Indigenous politics at the Twilight of Neoliberal Multiculturalism

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Charles Hale</b><br/> <i>Professor of Anthropology, Director Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas at Austin</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies</br> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-04-25

      Latin America: State Formation and the Emergence of New Forms of Property over Natural Resources

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Antonio Azuela de la Cueva</b><br/> <i>Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies</br> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-04-19

      Drug Trafficking and Impunity in United States, Mexico and Colombia

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Juan Carlos Echeverry</b><br/> <i>Ph.D. Economics</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: Organized crime, linked to cocaine trafficking, is having dreadful manifestations in regions in the United States, Mexico and Colombia. This paper analyzes empirically such manifestations and the local authorities'' response in these countries. A law enforcement model is presented where the reaction of authorities to shocks in the level of violence is analyzed within a framework of decentralized police and judicial decision-making, along the lines of Lucas (1973, 1976). Namely, law provision is performed at the regional level, with the response of authorities depending crucially on their perceptions regarding the origins of violence. To the extent that the causes of violence are systematically perceived as originating beyond local boundaries, the response of the violence shock at the regional level will vanish over time. This in turn implies that the total provision of justice in the country will be lower. We claim that this describes the Colombian experience during the 1980s and 1990s, Mexico''s current situation and, to a lesser extent the US''. We argue that over the past 10 years, the latter has responded differently to the rise in organized crime because in the thirties and seventies it developed federal institutions to confront this type of supra regional phenomenon. Colombia did the same in the late nineties and Mexico has just begun to do so.<br/> <br/> Former Minister of Finance of Colombia (Aug. 2010-Sep. 2012) and Minister of Economic Planning (Sep. 2000-Aug. 2002). Former Dean of Economics at Universidad de los Andes (Bogot'). Macroeconomist, policymaker and university professor, experienced in economic and political analysis. Responsible for the technical design and congressional approval of Colombia's economy stabilization package, 1998-2002; and for the program for Colombian economic takeoff, 2010-2014. Advisor during eight years of international banks and financial institutions with Global Source, a New York based consultancy, and Econcept, a Bogot' based consultancy. Weekly editorialist of CNN en Espa'ol (Atlanta) for three years. Strong theoretical and econometric skills. Proficient at presentations to specialists and the general public. Teaching experience at New York University and Universities in Colombia. Expert witness in litigations in topics of infrastructure concessions and finance. Has published papers in different fields of economics, in specialized journals, and three books on the Colombian economy; has participated in books on the Africa's and the Pacific Basin's economic development.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies</br> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-04-18

      The Oracular Sanctuaries of the Inca Empire: Their Nature and Function

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Marco Curatola</b><br/> <i>Professor of History & Coordinator of the Program of Andean Studies, Universidad Catolica del Peru </i><br/><br/> <i>Description</i>: Archaeological data and documentary sources show that oracles ''to wit, shrines controlled by the resident priesthood, through whom the gods answered those who consulted them''were one of the most noteworthy religious institution of the ancient Andean world. At the time of the Incas, there were many great sanctuaries home of long-distance pilgrimages and theater of crowded ceremonies and esoteric rites, such as those of Pachacamac, Titicaca, Coropuna, Huanacauri, Catequil and Huarivilca, which people visited regularly to consult their deities. In the talk it will be explored the nature and diffusion of such important religious Andean phenomena, as well as its political implications. Prof Curatola studied at the University of Genoa anthropology, history and archeology. He is an specialist of the history of Andean culture, with especial emphasis on the Inca society, the religion of the Andean world, the study of chronicles and indigenous sources. He is the author of ''Il Giardino d''oro del dio Sole. Dei, culti e messia delee Ande (Napoli 1997)'' and ''Adivinacion y oraculos en el mundo andino antiguo (edited with M. Ziolkowski, Lima, 2008). Currently he''s the codirector of the project ''Cuzco and the Incas in the Toledean period.'' From 1980 to 1999 he was the director of the Department of America in the Museo Natizionale Preistorico ed Etnografico de Roma. From 1991 to 2004 directed the America section of the Archeological Encyclopedia of del Istituto della Enciclopedia Italiana, Roma. He has been visiting professor at the University of Cambridge and Universita Gregoriana, and given lectures at the University of New York, Yale University, California Davis and many more. Worked for Unesco (1984-1987) and OIM (1992-1994) on projects related to cultural heritage in Latin America. He is a partner of the Institute of Andean Studies at Berkeley University. In 2002 was named ''Cavaliere'' the order of merit by the Italian Republic.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-04-16

      From Havana's Stages to the Silver Screen: A Reconsideration of the Cuban Zarzuela's 'Death by Film'

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Susan Thomas</b><br/> <i>Associate Professor. Musicology and Women's Studies, University of Georgia</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: The Cuban zarzuela flourished for a brief period of time, from the late 1920''s to the early 1940''s. Providing the Western hemisphere with some of its best-loved melodies, the zarzuela developed musical and dramatic codes for representing both hegemonic power and social marginality. Composers took preexisting racialized theatrical types and created a phenomenon that was as pedagogical as it was entertaining, instructing Cuba''s growing bourgeoisie about the need for social and racial stability. The zarzuela trafficked in desire, supporting a white supremacist ideology while simultaneously advocating the consumption of blackness, a strategy that it shared with the larger afrocubanismo movement (Moore, 1997). Blackness also served as a subversive signifier, however, and the performative codes of the musical stage created an ambivalent tension through which black bodies''and the sounds they produced''could critique existing power structures (see Moore,1997; Lane, 2005, Thomas, 2009). Several scholars, including myself, have blamed the zarzuela''s truncated lifespan the rise of cinema, which offered lower admission prices and greater theatrical realism. In my talk, I problematize this earlier view by suggesting that rather than replacing the zarzuela, the emerging Cuban and Mexican film industries absorbed and transformed it, appropriating its plots, performance practices, composers, technical designers, and the performers themselves. Additionally, one of the zarzuela''s most powerfully emblematic representations of difference, the use of blackface, was enthusiastically adapted to the screen''often rubbed onto the very same bodies who had popularized the practice on the Cuban stage. This transformation is examined through Lecuona''s 1930 zarzuela, Mar'a la O and the eponymous 1948 Cuban-Mexican co-production starring Rita Montaner, for whom the zarzuela''s title role was created. The film''s negotiation of its borrowed content is instructive in understanding how the radicalized codes of the zarzuela were reworked to speak to larger Latin American audience. I suggest that in removing specific cultural markers, filmmakers effectively excised any sense of subversive ambivalence from their original source material, engaging in a ''flattening out'' of radicalized discourse and performance practice that mirrored trends emanating from the U.S. and Europe. Dr. Susan Thomas, Associate Professor of Musicology and Women's Studies at the University of Georgia, received her Ph.D. in musicology from Brandeis University in 2002 and earned masters degrees from Tufts University and the New England Conservatory. Her research interests include music and gender, Cuban and Latin American music, transnationalism and migration, embodiment and performativity, music and race relations, and opera studies. Her book, Cuban Zarzuela: Performing Race and Gender on Havana's Lyric Stage (University of Illinois Press, 2008), received the Robert M. Stevenson Award from the American Musicological Society (AMS), 2011 and the Pauline Alderman Book Award for feminist research from the International Association of Women in Music. Other recently published articles and chapters include "Did Nobody Pass the Girls the Guitar? Queer Appropriations in Contemporary Cuban Popular Song," Journal of Popular Music 18/2 (2006), ''Musical Cartographies of the Transnational City: Mapping Havana in Song,'' Latin American Music Review 31/2 (2010); and chapters in Cuba Transnational, Fern'ndez, ed. (2005), De la zarzuela al cine: Los medios de comunicaci'n populares y su traducci'n de la voz marginal, ed. by Doppelbauer and Sartingen (2010), and ''Music, Conquest, and Colonization'' in W.W. Norton''s Musics of Latin America, ed. by Robin Moore, among others. Currently, she is preparing a book manuscript on the transnationalization of contemporary Cuban music.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies</br> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-04-11

      The Invention of Latin America: A Transnational History of Anti-Imperialism, Democracy, and Race

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Michael Gobat</b><br/> <i>Associate Professor, History. The University of Iowa</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: This talk re-thinks the origins and significance of the idea of Latin America. It considers how 'Latin America' was invented not by French imperialists, as commonly thought, but by South American elites protesting U.S. expansion into Central America in the 1850s. In tracing this process, the talk will illuminate the hidden tensions between racism, anti-imperialism, and democracy that have marked 'Latin America' from the very start. Michel Gobat's research interests focus on the impact of U.S. intervention in the Caribbean basin, and the nature of revolutionary processes in this region during the twentieth century. He completed a book entitled Confronting the American Dream: Nicaragua under U.S. Imperial Rule (2005). Based on research in Nicaraguan and U.S. archives, the book explores the effects of Americanization in Nicaragua from the heyday of Manifest Destiny through the U.S. military occupation of 1912-33. Michel has presented aspects of this work at conferences in the United States and Central America.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies</br> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-04-04

      What's so New About the New Multicultural Brazil?

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Jeffrey Lesser</b><br/> <i>Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History and Chair, Emory University</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies</br> <br/>

    • 2013-04-02

      Poverty and the Political Economy of Public Education Spending: Evidence from Brazil

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Leonardo Bursztyn</b><br/> <i>Assistant Professor of Economics, UCLA Anderson School of Management</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies</br> <br/>

    • 2013-03-28

      Major Trends in Drug Trafficking and Organized Crime in Latin America and the Caribbean in the 21st Century

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Bruce Bagley</b><br/> <i>Professor and Chair, Department of International Studies, University of Miami</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies</br> <br/>

    • 2013-03-27

      The State of Education in Brazil Today: Challenges and Innovations

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Denis Mizne</b><br/> <i>Executive Director, Fundação Lemann</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies</br> <br/>

    • 2013-03-26

      Monkeys, Humans and Yellow Fever: A Case of Lethal and Costly Misinformation in southern Brazil

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Julio Cesar Bicca-Marques</b><br/> <i>Lemann Distringuished Visiting Scholar, UIUC</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies</br> <br/>

    • 2013-03-12

      "VAMOS": Active Living, Enhancing Health

      <i>Speakers</i>: <b>Adiara Schwingel<br /> Wojciech Chodzko-Zajko<br /> Tania Benedetti</b><br/> <i>Kinesiology and Community Health, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies</br> <br/>

    • 2013-03-07

      Gender, Race, and Tourism in Andean Peru and Chiapas, Mexico

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Florence Babb</b><br/> <i>Vada Allen Yeomans Professor of Women's Studies, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies</br> <br/>

    • 2013-02-28

      Net Art, Digital Poetry and Rebellion in Latin America: Digital Contestation Post Y2K

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Eduardo Ledesma</b><br/> <i>Assistant Professor. Department of Spanish, Italian and Portuguese. UIUC</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies</br> <br/>

    • 2013-02-26

      Development, Inequality and the Rising of a "New Class“

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Celi Scanlon</b><br/> <i>Programa de Pós-Graduação em Sociologia e Antropologia - IFCS / UFRJ</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies</br> <br/>

    • 2013-02-21

      Technological Vanguards at the Periphery: Inter-tecnologidad in the Andes

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Anita Chan</b><br/> <i>Assistant Professor - Media and Cinema Studies - UIUC</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies</br> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-02-19

      Bossa Nova On Balance: Vetting Versions and Values

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Charles A. Perrone</b><br/> <i>Department of Spanish & Portuguese Studies - University of Florida</i><br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-02-15

      Racial Democracy: The Sociological History of a Concept

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Antonio Sergio Guimarães</b><br/> <i>Professor of Sociology, USP, Brazil</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: I will examine the coining, the uses, and meanings of the expression "racial democracy" from the 1930’s onwards including its transformation into an ideal for interracial cohabitation and of political inclusion of Blacks in postwar Brazilian modernity. It will also examine the refusal of the expression by the Black activists of the MNU in the 1970s and their denunciation of its mythical character, as well as its current uses by anthropologists and sociologists engaged in the critique of identity politics.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies</br> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-02-07

      Leviathan Evolving: New Varieties of State Capitalism in Brazil and Beyond

      <i>Speaker</i>: <b>Aldo Musacchio</b><br/> <br/> <i>Associate Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School</i><br/> <br/> <i>Description</i>: In this book we study the evolution of corporate governance arrangements that governments in emerging markets, and more specifically in Brazil, have adopted in the last 20 years. We argue that governments have transformed the governance of flagship state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in a way that has improved significantly the agency problems that were pervasive in public firms in the 1970s and 1980s. We argue that the process of privatization and liberalization of the 1990s and early 2000s created two new forms of hybrid capitalism in which SOEs operate as publicly-listed corporations, with the government acting as a majority or minority shareholder. The book describes the transformation in SOEs, the improvements in governance and the forms in which governments still use its financial arms to lend and invest in companies. For instance, in Brazil the government uses the national development bank invests in equity and provides subsidized loans to companies. The book explores what firms do with such loans and capital injections. We do not argue that the new models of state capitalism have solved all of the agency and political problems of the old forms of state capitalism. The argument is that the new models of state capitalism have eliminated many agency problems, but still there are obstacles and political temptations making it hard to eliminate political intervention in state-owned enterprises or in the provision of subsidized loans to politically-connected firms. That is, these new models of state capitalism are perhaps a second best solution, yet a solution that is the product of the complex political economy of emerging markets.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor</i>: Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series</i>: CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2013-02-05

      O Sublime Sertão: Miragens do Brasil em O Sertanejo, Os Sertões e Grande Sertão: Veredas

      <em>Speaker: </em><strong>Antonio Tosta</strong> <br/> <i>Assistant Professor, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese, UIUC</i> <br/><br/> <i>Description: </i>Tema recorrente na literatura, cinema e música brasileira, assunto privilegiado nas ciências sociais e naturais, o sertão ainda é apresentado como um espaço mítico e misterioso e um lugar do “outro” para a maioria dos brasileiros e estrangeiros que mais e mais se encantam com a sua complexidade geográfica, histórica e cultural. A partir de vários aspectos da categoria estética do “sublime”, discutida por autores como Longino, Burke e Kant, esta apresentação aborda o tema do sertão em três textos litérarios brasileiros para demonstrar como este se espelha ou confunde com o próprio Brasil, espaço também vasto, plural e resistente a definições.<br/> <br/> <i>Sponsor: </i>Lemann Institute for Brazilian Studies<br/> <br/> <i>Lecture Series: </i>CLACS Spring 2013 Lecture Series

    • 2012-12-06

      Home Fortification of Complementary Foods with Multiple Micronutrients Powders: Planning a New Strategy to Prevent Anemia in Brazilian Children

      <i>Description</i>: Despite numerous prevention and control strategies adopted by different countries over the past few decades, little progress has been made in reducing the prevalence of childhood anemia. A recent publication by the World Health Organization (WHO) analyzed the adoption of complementary strategies for the prevention and control of anemia in children 6 to 23 months of age, suggesting home fortification with multiple micronutrients in conjunction with basic healthcare actions. The aim of this ongoing study is to assess the effectiveness, acceptance and adherence of home fortification with vitamins and minerals for the prevention of anemia in infants attending at public healthcare centers. A multi-center study involving four Brazilian cities (Goinia, Olinda, Rio Branco and Porto Alegre) is proposed. The study design is a pragmatic cluster controlled trial involving health centers under the primary healthcare model (Traditional and Family Health Strategy). A sample size of 135 children in control and intervention groups, respectively, is envisaged. A total of 540 infants will be recruited from Rio Branco and Porto Alegre (Traditional healthcare model), 270 from Olinda (Family Health Strategy model) and 540 from Goinia (both Traditional and Family Health Strategy models), to give an overall sample of 1350 infants for the four cities. At study baseline, a control group of infants 12 to 14 months of age shall receive routine pediatric healthcare. In parallel, an intervention group of infants 6 to 8 months of age shall be submitted to an intervention involving home fortification as per WHO recommendations. After 6 months of the intervention, the effectiveness and impact of fortification will be analyzed by comparing intervention and control groups, both comprising infants 12 to 14 months of age. The experimental groups shall be compared overall and stratified by basic healthcare model.

    • 2012-10-25

      Resource Nationalism in Latin America: Concepts, Politics and Policy

      &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Resource Nationalism in Latin America: Concepts, Politics and Policy&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;David Mares&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Institute of the Americas Chair for Inter-American Affairs. Director, Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies. Professor, Political Science, University of California, San Diego&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;The core idea behind a resource nationalism perspective is that natural resources belong to the nation and should be used for its benefit above all. Every Latin American country owns its subsoil resources, which is the global norm, though not the case in the US or Canada. Nevertheless, the translation of resource nationalism into an energy policy varies across Latin America, as each country sets the terms for exploration, production, transportation and distribution of energy. Within this context three issues drive energy politics and thus energy policy: the distribution of rents derived from the resources (i.e., between public-private, rural-urban and among classes); the role of the market (i.e., international-domestic; for production or consumption); and the need to keep a level of investment in the sector that will replace reserves and produce a certain level of energy. The presentation will review these variations and offer a preliminary argument to explain them.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;CLACS Spring 2012 Lecture Series

    • 2012-10-23

      The Revolt of the Whip

      &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;The Revolt of the Whip&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Joseph Love&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Professor Emeritus, History. Former director of Lemann Institute&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;This talk concerns a new book that brings to life a unique and spectacular set of events in Latin American history. In November 1910, shortly after the inauguration of Brazilian President Hermes da Fonseca, ordinary sailors killed several officers and seized control of major new combat vessels, including two of the most powerful battleships ever produced, and commenced bombing Rio de Janeiro. The mutineers, led by an Afro-Brazilian and mostly black themselves, demanded greater rights&#39;above all the abolition of flogging in the Brazilian navy, the last Western navy to tolerate it. This form of torture was closely associated in the sailors&#39; minds with slavery, which had only been prohibited in Brazil in 1888. These events and the scandals that followed initiated a sustained debate about the role of race and class in Brazilian society and the extent to which Brazil could claim to be a modern nation. The commemoration of the centenary of the mutiny in 2010 saw the country still divided about the meaning of the Revolt of the Whip.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;CLACS Spring 2012 Lecture Series

    • 2012-10-16

      Regional Disparities in Brazil: Evolution, Consequences, and Policy Alternatives

      &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Regional Disparities in Brazil: Evolution, Consequences, and Policy Alternatives&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Carlos Azzoni&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Dean of the Faculty of Economics, Administration and Accounting. University of San Paolo. Lemann Distinguished Visitor Fall 12’&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;The presentation deals with the general trends of economic concentration and inequality across Brazilian regions. General indicators are presented revealing the high degree of economic disparities in the country and its persistency. Regional concentration and its evolution is measured by the economic center of gravity, defined as the GDP-weighted latitude and longitude in each year for its regions. The evolution of productivity in agriculture, manufacturing and tertiary activities reveals that the traditional areas still keep their competitive position even after many changes in the country&#39;s economy.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;CLACS Spring 2012 Lecture Series

    • 2012-09-13

      Peruvian Writers: Mario Vargas Llosa and Jose Maria Arguedas

      &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Peruvian writers: Mario Vargas Llosa and Jose Maria Arguedas&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Efrain Kristal&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Professor and Chair, Department of Comparative Literature, UCLA&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Sara Castro-Klaren&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Professor of Latin American Culture and Literatures, John Hopkins University&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;Update required.&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt;&lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies&lt;br /&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;br /&gt;&lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;CLACS Spring 2012 Lecture Series

    • 2012-09-11

      Free Colored under Slavery in Brazil

      <i>Title: </i><b>Free Colored under Slavery in Brazil</b><br/> <i>Speaker: </i><b>Herbert Klein</b> <br/> <i>Director of the Center for Latin American Studies. Profess of History, Stanford University and Gouverneur Morris Professor of History at Columbia University</i> <br/><br/> <i>Description: </i>There is little question that Portuguese America produced the largest free colored class under slavery in the Americas. Long before the abolition of slavery or even the abolition of the slave trade, free colored outnumbered slaves in Brazil. By the census of 1872 they were also by far the single largest ethnic/status group in Brazilian society. The aim of this talk will be to describe the origin, development and relative importance of this group under slavery. This study will concentrate on the forms of manumission and the role of the free colored class in a free economy. The findings are based on new historical research for all regions of Brazil in Brazilian masters and doctoral theses as well as my own long term research into the slave and free society of Sao Paulo. <br/> <i>Sponsor: </i>Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies <br/> <i>Lecture Series: </i>CLACS Spring 2012 Lecture Series

    • 2012-04-30

      Displaced for Development? Indigenous Peoples Rights and Extractive Industries Development in the Peruvian Andes and Amazonia

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Manuel Glave presents case studies of large scale mining and drilling in Peru and it&#39;s effects on the indigenous population. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Displaced for Development? Indigenous Peoples Rights and Extractive Industries Development in the Peruvian Andes and Amazonia&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Manuel Glave&lt;/b&gt; &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Senior Researcher for the Group for the Analysis of Development in Latin America&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;The recent boom of extractive industries in the Peruvian Andes and Amazonia has contributed to the rapid economic growth and poverty alleviation that has made Peru one of the more social and economic dynamic country in Latin America. However, several critical issues have emerged in the process. Territorial and human rights of indigenous peoples are commonly overlooked, lack of land use planning tools has induced overlapped property rights, the role of local and sub national (regional) governments is not clearly defined, and the prior informed consent paradigm has not been appropriately understood and implemented. The presentation will be based upon case studies of large scale mining in the Peruvian Andes and oil and gas exploration and extraction in the Peruvian Amazon. &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;CLACS Spring 2012 Lecture Series

    • 2012-04-27

      Saving South America's Ecosystem Functions

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Donald Sawyer talks about the critical savanna ecosystems in Brazil and what action is needed to save them. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Saving South America&#39;s Ecosystem Functions&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Donald Sawyer&lt;/b&gt; &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Visiting Lemann Professor at Harvard&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;The talk deals with the influences of markets and policies on deforestation in Brazil&#39;s Amazon and Cerrado (savanna) regions. Clearing in the Amazon has dropped primarily because of structural economic trends in modernization of agriculture. The savannas are vital, but more threatened. The key goal should be maintenance of ecosystem functions, including hydrological cycles, at the macro-landscape scale. Action requires new knowledge and an eco-social approach. It would be appropriate to launch an initiative to &quot;Save Our Savannas - SOS!&quot; &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies

    • 2012-04-19

      Rural Nicaragua Under the New Sandinista Government: A Report from the Field

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;This presentation examines peasant political agency in processes of state formation under the current Sandinista government. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Rural Nicaragua Under the New Sandinista Government: A Report from the Field&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Rosario Montoya&lt;/b&gt; &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Former Assistant Professor, Women’s Studies, Western Michigan University&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;This presentation examines campesino (peasant) political agency in processes of state formation under the current Sandinista government. It focuses in particular on the often contentious relationship between Sandinista campesino leaders and Sandinista government officials, particularly municipal government officials. Unlike the Sandinista revolutionary period (1979-1990), when myriad organizations mediated the relationship between campesinos and the state, today it is campesinos&#39; relationship to municipal authorities that forms the key nexus tying campesino communities to the state and national-level political processes. This presentation aims to both shed light on the dynamics of municipal politics, and to highlight the active role that campesinos are taking in shaping these politics. &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;CLACS Spring 2012 Lecture Series

    • 2012-04-05

      Different Forces: Cultural topographies and the liberal state in Oaxaca, Mexico

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Poole explores how recent legal and visual projects forwarded by the Oaxacan state unsettle the languages of identity and place that underwrite both ideals of &#39;national&#39; belonging and locality. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Different Forces: Cultural topographies and the liberal state in Oaxaca, Mexico&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Deborah Poole&lt;/b&gt; &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Professor of Anthropology, John Hopkins University&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;How does state form give life to the dispersed sentiments of fear and aspiration that are engendered in contemporary disputes concerning culture and place? What role do visual technologies and projects play in the governance and production of difference? In modern Mexico, the notion of nation has often been invoked to explain the force that ideals of moral community and cultural affinity have acquired in modern Mexico. Visual projects for the construction of national types and racialized ideals of identity have played a central role in our analyses of these dynamics of national and regional identity formation. Yet less attention has been paid to the administrative and legal forms through which the governmental state engages difference as politics and as a site of governance. Taking the state of Oaxaca as its ethnographic ground, this paper explores how recent legal and visual projects forwarded by the Oaxacan state unsettle the languages of identity and place that underwrite both ideals of &#39;national&#39; belonging and locality, and the state&#39;s own territorializing project. &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;Anthropology Reading Group &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Co-sponsors: &lt;/i&gt;Department of Anthropology

    • 2012-03-15

      Four or Five Myths about Brazil and Latin America

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Joao Ribeiro talks about some myths about Brazil and Latin America. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Four or Five Myths about Brazil and Latin America&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Joao Ubaldo Osorio Pimentel Ribeiro&lt;/b&gt; &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Writer, Journalist, Winner of Camoes Prize 2008&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;Joao Ribeiro talks about some myths about Brazil and Latin America. He disagrees with the concept of Latin America as a cultural entity. Countries in Latin America do not share a common language, common interests or a common identity. Often peoples know little about each other. Notions of a common racial identity or universal &quot;pre-Brazil&quot; are inaccurate. In fact, race in Brazil is very much mixed. Revolutionary talk inspired by left-wing movements is also something of a myth. These factors combined make a concept of a universal &quot;South American&quot; or &quot;Latin American&quot; culture absurd. &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;CLACS Spring 2012 Lecture Series

    • 2012-03-14

      Illinois International: The Making of a Transnational Gang Crisis

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Author and professor Elana Zilberg joins Illinois International&#39;s Nicole Tami to talk about her research and book on transnational gang development between Los Angeles and San Salvador, immigration, and security. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;&lt;i&gt;Illinois International&lt;/i&gt;: &quot;The Making of a Transnational Gang Crisis&quot;&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Host: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Nicole Tami&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Associate Director for International Engagement, IECP&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Guest: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Elana Zilberg&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Associate Professor, Communication Department, and Associate Director, Center for Global California Studies at UCSD&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;Elana Zilberg&#39;s research interests lie at the intersection of security, space, and movement between the Americas. In her book &lt;i&gt;Space of Detention: The Making of a Transnational Gang Crisis between Los Angeles and San Salvador&lt;/i&gt;, Zilberg examines how the borders of the nation state are policed on the streets of immigrant barrios in the United States and barrios marginales in El Salvador, and how the political geography of these urban landscapes are integrated into what Zilberg terms “neoliberal securityscapes” by the combined forces of neoliberalism and globalization, and the intersection between immigration, criminal, and antiterrorist law. Zilberg discusses her findings with moderator Nicole Tami on this episode of &lt;i&gt;Illinois International&lt;/i&gt;. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;International Programs and Studies, University of Illinois &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Co-sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;UI-7, the cable TV service of the University of Illinois

    • 2012-02-23

      Multiculturalism and Miscegenation in the Construction of Latin America`s Cultural Identity

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Eduardo Coutihno examines the discourse of Latin American identity. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Multiculturalism and Miscegenation in the Construction of Latin America`s Cultural Identity&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Eduardo Coutihno&lt;/b&gt; &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Distinguished Lemann Visiting Professor, University of Illinois&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;The construction of the discourse of Latin American identity has always been characterized by a powerful tension marked by the dominant presence of the colonizer&#39;s outlook and, on the other hand, by attempts at deviating or disrupting such an outlook. This tension, already noticeable when one compares the first texts produced in the continent, was particularly significant at certain moments of Latin American history and became dominant in the twentieth century. In this talk, we will examine some of the most crucial moments in the construction of this discourse of identity, and will focus especially upon the second half of the twentieth century, when currents of thought such as Deconstruction, Cultural Studies and the so-called Post-Colonial Theory deeply affected Latin American Weltanschauung, leading intellectuals to face the continent&#39;s problems from their own perspective, and to search for an international dialogue on equal footing with their partners. This journey of search for identity which the continent has undergone and which is mostly expressed by its tradition of essay-writing, will be approached here mainly by means of two topoi, frequently present in such production, especially of its most recent phases: miscegenation and multiculturalism. &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;CLACS Spring 2012 Lecture Series

    • 2011-11-10

      Comparative Literature in Brazil: Aspects and Problems

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Eduardo Coutinho talks about how comparative analysis of Brazilian and Latin American literature provides an antidote to traditional Eurocentrism. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Comparative Literature in Brazil: Aspects and Problems&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Eduardo F. Coutinho&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Distinguished Lemann Visiting Professor, UIUC&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;Eduardo Coutinho talks about Brazilian and Latin American literature. He argues that comparative literature in Brazil and Latin America has had the effect of freeing literature from traditional European hegemony. In particular, Coutinho says that comparativism expanded the dynamics of influence. No longer was Europe the center of thought, providing unilateral influence to colonialized literature. Rather, with the development of comparativism, interactions between the literatures were perceived as bilateral. Coutinho argues there are three levels of influence on Latin American literature: 1) The relationship between Latin America and Western Europe 2) The relationship between national literature within Latin America 3) The characterization of the heterogeneity of national literature within a continental context. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Co-sponsors: &lt;/i&gt;College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    • 2011-10-27

      The Alliance for Progress: Social Science and Hemispheric Hegemony

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Smith talks about the impact of the Alliance for Progress enacted by the Kennedy administration. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;The Alliance for Progress: Social Science and Hemispheric Hegemony&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Speaker: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Peter Smith&lt;/b&gt; &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Distinguished Professor of Political Science, UC San Diego&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;Smith talks about the Alliance for Progress enacted during a unique moment in history by the Kennedy administration. He talks about the high ambitions of the Kennedy era, and how the perception of Latin America as a sector ripe for revolution led to the development of the Alliance for Progress. Smith explains the intellectual foundation for the alliance, the politics and aspirations of the Alliance for Progress and the outcomes of the Alliance. &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Global Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;The Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies Lecture Series FALL 2011

    • 2010-04-07

      Illinois International: A Conversation with Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Rafael Vicente Correa Delgado, President of the Republic of Ecuador, joins Illinois International&#39;s Nicole Tami to talk about issues facing the South American nation, the new constitution, and his presidency. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;&lt;i&gt;Illinois International&lt;/i&gt;: A Conversation with Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Host: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Nicole Tami&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Associate Director for International Engagement, IECP&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Guest: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Rafael Correa&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;President, Republic of Ecuador&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;Rafael Vicente Correa Delgado is the President of the Republic of Ecuador and was the president pro tempore of the Union of South American Nations. An economist educated in Ecuador, Belgium and the United States, he was elected President in late 2006 and took office in January 2007. He discusses his presidency and other issues regarding Ecuador with moderator Nicole Tami on this episode of &lt;i&gt;Illinois International&lt;/i&gt;. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;International Programs and Studies, University of Illinois &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Co-sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;UI-7, the cable TV service of the University of Illinois

    • 2010-02-17

      Illinois International: The Shifting Political Climate in Latin America

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;Werner Baer, Jorge Lemann Professor of Economics at the University of Illinois, joins Illinois International&#39;s Nicole Tami to discuss the recent rise of socialism and renewed popular movements in Latin America. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;&lt;i&gt;Illinois International&lt;/i&gt;: The Shifting Political Climate in Latin America&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Host: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Nicole Tami&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Associate Director for International Engagement, IECP&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Guest: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Werner Baer&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Jorge Lemann Professor of Economics at the University of Illinois&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;Werner Baer is an American economist at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and the Jorge Lemann Professor of Economics. He received his Bachelor&#39;s degree from Queen&#39;s College in 1953, and a Master&#39;s and a Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1955 and 1958 respectively. His research centers on Latin America&#39;s industrialization and economic development, especially of Import Substitution Industrialization (ISI) and Brazil. He discusses the rise of socialism in Latin America with moderator Nicole Tami on this episode of &lt;i&gt;Illinois International&lt;/i&gt;. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;International Programs and Studies, University of Illinois &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Co-sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;UI-7, the cable TV service of the University of Illinois

    • 2009-10-15

      Brazil's Rising Status in the 21st Century: A Roundtable Discussion

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;A group of experts on Brazil answer a number of questions about Brazil in the 21st Century. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Brazil&#39;s Rising Status in the 21st Century: A Roundtable Discussion&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Host: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Werner Boer&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Jorge Lemann Professor of Economics&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Presenters: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Tasso Jereissati&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Federal Senator from Brazil&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Yeda Crusius&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Former Governor of Brazilian state Rio Grande do Sul (2007-2011)&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Mauricio Rands&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Lawyer, Professor and Brazilian Politician&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Alexandre Tombini&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Current president of the Central Bank of Brazil&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Edmund Amann&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Reader in development economics, University of Manchester &lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Carlos Azzoni&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Full Professor of Economics at the University of Sao Paulo&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Jorge Paulo Lemann&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Brazillian Entrepeneur&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;A group of experts on Brazil answer a number of questions about Brazil in the 21st Century. Questions about Brazil&#39;s economy, the legal system, the role of the state, the impact of the recent economic crisis, and questions on other topics are answered by a panel of experts. &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;Inaugeral event for the Lemann Institute of Latin American Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Co-sponsors: &lt;/i&gt;College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    • 2009-10-15

      Lemann Institute: Inauguration Ceremony and Reception

      &lt;i&gt;Abstract: &lt;/i&gt;The official inauguration ceremony and reception for the creation of the Lemann Institute. &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Title: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;b&gt;Lemann Institute: Inauguration Ceremony and Reception&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Speakers: &lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Andrew Orta&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Associate Professor of Anthropology, UIUC&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Joseph Love&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Interim Director of Lemann Institute of Brazilian Studies and Professor of History, UIUC&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Richard Herman&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Chancellor, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (2005-2009)&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Alexandre Porto&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Minister-Counselor of Cultural, Educational and Administrative Affairs, Brazilian Embassy&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Jorge Paulo Lemann&lt;/b&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Brazilian Entrepeneur&lt;/i&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;b&gt;Bate Calado&lt;/b&gt;&lt;/br&gt; &lt;i&gt;Musical Ensemble&lt;/i&gt; &lt;br/&gt;&lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Description: &lt;/i&gt;This is the inauguration ceremony for the Lemann Institute. Andrew Orta thanks a number of scholars critical to the foundation of the Lemann Institute. Joseph Love and Richard Herman talk about Jorge Paulo Lemann&#39;s contributions to the University of Illinois. Alexandre Porto congratulates the university on the establishment of the Lemann Institute on behalf of the Brazilian Embassy. Jorge Paulo Lemann makes a few comments about his reasons for making his donation. Finally, a performance of Brazilian music from the musical ensemble Bate Calado ends the festivities. &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Sponsor: &lt;/i&gt;Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Lecture Series: &lt;/i&gt;Inaugeral event for the Lemann Institute of Latin American Studies &lt;br/&gt; &lt;i&gt;Co-sponsors: &lt;/i&gt;College of Liberal Arts and Sciences